Rescuing a Chow Chow

General discussions about Chow Chows.

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GoBears
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Rescuing a Chow Chow

Postby GoBears » Sun Jun 16, 2013 5:11 pm

Hello,

I went to the shelter today and took a few pictures of a Chow Chow I was contacted about. His nose looks badly injured and his ear looks like it's been bitten off. His eye also seems a little abnormal. I don't know much about Chow Chows so I wanted to ask if he's going to heal from this. He looks very shy, did not bark once while i was there (15 mins or so). I still want to adopt him because he looks like he's been through a lot. They told me because he's a dominant breed, I have to have an interview and that having a dominant breed will raise the home insurance for the home owner. Is that true? That might be a problem. Also, is the interview something I should be worried about?

Other than that, he's an adorable Chow Chow we would love to welcome home!

Thanks,
Eric
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Me & Tess
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Re: Rescuing a Chow Chow

Postby Me & Tess » Sun Jun 16, 2013 6:07 pm

The pictures are really big so can't comment on them. It is true about some home owner's insurances. & we didn't get home owner's insurance until we lost our Tess. I think that it is a good thing that he was good around you. That is a plus. He may need to be vetted, what you see is only surface scars. I am hoping that you will find out more about him (& research the breed). Adopting a Chow is really a commitment. We adopted our Lilly and really we don't really know what happened to her before she came to us. Lilly is a work in progress. One thing I know, you have to put your heart into adopting a Chow & work with what you have. Some times it take months, sometimes it only takes a fraction of a second to really bond. You seem to have a good heart - go for it. Rescue this poor Chow. Having a dominate breed is not a bad thing. You have to be open to the possibilities that there could be a situation where dominance could be a problem, but you need to be strong enough to solve it. Just state honestly how you feel during the interview & you will do fine. My Tess was 70 lbs. of female dominance & my Lilly is 40 lbs. of female dominance. There about four or five breeds that are considered more dominant than a Chow.
Last edited by Me & Tess on Sun Jun 16, 2013 6:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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applebear
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Re: Rescuing a Chow Chow

Postby applebear » Sun Jun 16, 2013 6:18 pm

It is true, he could raise your home insurance due to his breed. A lot of it depends on your insurance and area. It's too hard to tell you about the wounds...a vet would be more reliable there. He very well could heal just fine from them, but unless you know why he has them...no one can give an accurate answer [if from fighting, they most likely will heal].

I would suggest researching the breed a lot first. They def are not for everyone. But for the right people, they are the most loyal loving and faithful breed of dog you can imagine. This particular chow looks like he's been through a lot, and he may not warm up to people right away...with time and patience, he'd probably most def make someone a great companion.

I wish you luck, but please do research first! :)
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chow4life
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Re: Rescuing a Chow Chow

Postby chow4life » Sun Jun 16, 2013 6:45 pm

My best guess would be his injuries are from being in a fight. The cut on him in the picture looks like it. That doesn't mean necessarily that he started it. He could have been attacked. Who knows for sure. Chows are very stubborn, smart, loyal, loving and just overall wonderful. With that being said they take dedication for a lifetime. They bond very strong with there owners. Without knowing his history you must go into this with open eyes and expectations knowing that he might have issues. You will have up's and down's. If you can give him your time, patience, and dedication you will have a bestfriend for life. I commend you for reaching out to this poor chow that obviously needs a leader. Remember we are all here to help you should you have any questions. Good luck. I hope this works out. Keep us updated.

The insurance was not an issue for me. I have moved twice and had two different insurance companies and they knew i had a rottweiller and a chow. They insured both. This raised my insurance very little.

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Laura
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Re: Rescuing a Chow Chow

Postby Laura » Sun Jun 16, 2013 6:51 pm

Wow that poor baby! As far as insurance I guess it depends on where you live and who insures you. I have Statefarm and I don't pay anything extra. Please let us know if you save this poor guy. He is beautiful even with the boo boo's that need vet care!
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Chloe (left) Shuggy (right)

ski
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Re: Rescuing a Chow Chow

Postby ski » Mon Jun 17, 2013 4:20 pm

This poor little soul seems to have been through a lot. We rescued two chows...didn't think we needed or wanted them but they needed us. Having had them I can't imagine having any other breed. The two of them melt my heart each and every day.

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Sarahloo
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Re: Rescuing a Chow Chow

Postby Sarahloo » Mon Jun 17, 2013 5:15 pm

The interview won't be a problem. They just don't want their Chow to end up with a person who uses him to frighten others and trains him to be agressive. Be nice, calm and respectful and you'll be just fine. Tell them you want the dog to give him a great home and make him happy and that you are prepared to spend time and money on his well-being. You can also score points if the dog doesn't have to be alone too long every day. With your parents in the same house, you could probably work something out with them. If you have experience with dogs (I think you do?), that is also a good thing to point out!
He doesn't look like he started that fight, poor thing! :-( While female dogs usually swoon over male Chows, male dogs can get quite agressive when they see a Chow. I can't really see his eye, but his nose will heal and look normal again. And his ear will heal and fur will probably cover the scar.
Thank you for considering to adopt a dog!
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sk8thom
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Re: Rescuing a Chow Chow

Postby sk8thom » Wed Jun 19, 2013 3:55 pm

Our Bubba Jr. looked pretty scruffy when we rescued him, but with the right food and positive attitude he has turned into a great big beautiful boy.

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Re: Rescuing a Chow Chow

Postby lizmof » Wed Jul 03, 2013 2:51 am

Our Kyra was a rescue dog, initially very traumatized by the experience. She couldn't be left alone for more than a minute without freaking out - pacing, whimpering, scratching, etc. She was like this for the first couple of weeks we had her, then it was a few more months to get completely relaxed in her new home. We found that the traditional dog activities - walks, feeding treats, etc - were not what enabled the bonding and mellowing out. She wanted to be treated like a person . We would talk to her, cuddle her, and include her in everyday activities.
Definitely worth the effort. She is an amazing dog, fiercely loyal and very protective!
How did the interview go?


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