Behaviour And Rescues

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Larry Harris
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Postby Larry Harris » Wed Sep 26, 2007 2:03 pm

It is great to be willing to cooperate with other rescues. However, you need to decide up front what you are comfortable working with where other rescues are concerned.


Sage advice.

Very much a double edge sword, you are dammed if you do and damned if you don't. Rescues want to help as many Chows as possible however we limit who we work with.

We can only control our direct actions. By not working with other rescues because they do things differently are we hurting a second chance for a Chow? I am to old to ever worry what others think of me. I am happy in my little part of the world. Our goal as is yours is to help as many dogs as we can not be killed and place them in a good home.

I have seen in very short time many rescues that refuse to work together, I am truly saddened by that. We can not get over our human differences to help in a single goal.

No one wants to put dogs in to harms way so we make things harder! By not working together and creating new networks are we limiting our Chows chances caused by our small groups and small resource's being full?

At some point and way to fast I might add rescues fill up and can not save that one more dog. Then across the street or across the nation there is a group that has a family that is ready for an older dog. But oops we don't work with them. Guess this can also go hand in hand with when is a recues adoption policy to strict or is that possible.

Big double edge sword. Thank you for sharing your views with us.

Larry
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luvchows

Postby luvchows » Wed Sep 26, 2007 7:30 pm

<<By not working with other rescues because they do things differently are we hurting a second chance for a Chow?>>

Let me share another side of this coin. Say you help place a dog for another rescue only to find out that the dog had never seen a vet during its stay in the previous rescue’s “foster home”. The adopters take the dog to their vet and find out the dog has luxating patella. The adoptive family is heartbroken. They cannot afford the expensive surgery, nor do they want to go through this with a new dog, so they turn him in to the nearest shelter. The dog ends up being passed around while remaining untreated and the adopters are left feeling like rescue is an awful, heartbreaking experience. They go straight to a backyard breeder and buy a puppy.

Since you helped the irresponsible rescue place the dog, you are just as responsible for what happens to that dog and what has happened to this family. My caution is to KNOW the rescues you work with to be sure they are responsible with their dogs and with their adopters.


<<By not working together and creating new networks are we limiting our Chows chances caused by our small groups and small resource's being full?>>

Join a national group and get to know the rescues involved so that you know which ones you can rely on and which rescues are responsible. Do not assume that everyone in rescue is responsible with their dogs or their adopters. THEY ARE NOT!


<<At some point and way to fast I might add rescues fill up and can not save that one more dog. Then across the street or across the nation there is a group that has a family that is ready for an older dog. But oops we don't work with them. Guess this can also go hand in hand with when is a rescue adoption policy to strict or is that possible.>>

Unless the adopter has met the dog they are adopting, long distance adoptions are a gamble. If you decide to adopt long distance be sure you have reliable, responsible back up for the dog in case the people decide they don’t want the dog for any reason. The back up rescue should be prepared to take the dog back quickly, care for and hold the dog until transport can be arranged back to you (which can take weeks).


I caution you to go slowly and not get in over your head. Keep your mind and eyes open, learn from others that have gone before you and try to glean as much from other rescuer’s experiences as you can. Remember, other rescues with a lot more experience have been through exactly what you are going through now. That is how they developed their rescue policies and procedures.

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Larry Harris
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Postby Larry Harris » Wed Sep 26, 2007 7:41 pm

I caution you to go slowly and not get in over your head. Keep your mind and eyes open, learn from others that have gone before you and try to glean as much from other rescuer’s experiences as you can. Remember, other rescues with a lot more experience have been through exactly what you are going through now. That is how they developed their rescue policies and procedures.


Thank you, We will gladly take your advice and counsel. I have already learned a great deal in a short time and yet still have more to learn.

Larry
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JammyJoy
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Re: Behaviour And Rescues

Postby JammyJoy » Fri Mar 01, 2013 2:42 am

One of the most maddening reasons is relatively common: many Chow owners do not realize that Chows have been bred for centuries to perform their duties independently of direction from humans. Consequently, Chows generally do not come when called regardless of the amount of training they receive. When a Chow owner mistakenly believes that a Chow needs off-leash exercise and does not know they don't come when called, disaster often occurs. The owner gives up in frustration and abandons the dog. Chows generally do not leave the area where they were abandoned...


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