Cancer

Health topics and issues with Chow Chows.

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tgoetsch

Cancer

Post by tgoetsch » Wed Mar 02, 2005 12:01 pm

I have owned 3 chow chows since 1987. Two girls and a big boy. I had to put down one when she went into BLOAT, she had an eye removed due to cancer before that. My other girl was diagnosed with an agressive cancer in her mouth but had to be put down because of severe arthristis. Finally my big boy was diagnosed with angio/hemangiosarcoma in October 2004. We have been battling a leg where the tumor is coming back and constantly weeping. Since hemangiosarcoma is a blood vessel cancer his prognosis is not good. I am concerned that cancer is a definite concern with the breed. Does anyone know if cancer is prevelant throughout the breed? I was told by a breeder at a show that BLOAT was more common than I knew. Any information on the health issues of the ChowChow will help in future decisions on the breed.

bubba

health conditions of chows

Post by bubba » Wed Mar 02, 2005 12:40 pm

i don't think chows are more suseptable to cancer . i read an AKC medical studies site where some breeds do have a greater suspetability to cancer, . but i have also read that cancer is the biggest killer of dogs after accidents ..
here is a site discusses chow and common conditions

http://www.barkbytes.com/bremed/chow.htm

http://www.petstation.com/drbob-dog-breed-diseases.html

http://www.geocities.com/sengechow/genetics.html

hope this helps

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Post by tgoetsch » Thu Mar 03, 2005 7:49 am

Thanks those are some great links.

kiaoh

Cancer...

Post by kiaoh » Sun Mar 06, 2005 8:49 pm

I have had Three Chow Chow since 1995 My best Friend Marya past away at 8 years of age from cancer in her uteris... I was the most pain full thing that her and I ever had to do... I miss her very much.. The vet said that it just happens in older female dogs, not that it was a common Chow Chow issue.. My now 2 1/2 year old Red Male Chow Chow is in GREAT health!!!!!

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Post by Judy Fox » Fri Mar 11, 2005 2:53 pm

Kiaoh, this cancer of the uterus could be a good idea to have a female chow spayed if you don't want to breed from her - then she cannot get cancer there or indeed a pyometra.
Both my Chows, Milly and Mabel had pyometra when they were only about 18 months old - very young for bitches and had to have full hysterectomy - but at least they can have no more trouble with their wombs!
So sorry to hear about your females but I am so glad your boy is well. :)
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carolyn

cancer in chows

Post by carolyn » Sun Mar 13, 2005 6:26 am

I have lost two of my chows and a doberman to cancer, Melushka developed cancer of the throat and Crystal of the stomach.
There are so many remadies, but I will never find the answer to this.
Just to let you know maybe not the remedy for cancer but definatly the remedy for skin problems, My chows eat avacoda pears, now that they are in season and love them, green or ripe does not matter, and their coats are looking lovely try it you will be amazed at the difference in their health and skin and coats, maybe it will help the cancer as well.
Carolyn

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Cancer in Chows

Post by carolyn dewrance » Sun Mar 20, 2005 9:30 am

MELTARI MELUSHKA
You all read about the devastating effect of the infrared lamp on my puppies. Now I am going to tell you about my blind chow, "Melushka".
She was the pick of the litter, a lovely sturdy puppy with good bone and a lovely head; only we did not know that she would never be able to see.
As a tiny puppy she won every one's heart. When we realized there was something very wrong with her sight, I took her to my vet who confirmed my fears and suggested that we put her down. She was then 8 Weeks old. Instead I asked him to inoculate her as I would be keeping her, blind or not she was a Chow and one of mine.

As the months went past, we watched her grow from a tiny puppy, which at first would stumble around the garden finding her feet, but soon learnt where every obstacle was that she might bump into. In her rush around the yard, she soon learned that her best friends were my three cats. She would gleefully sniff them out and the chase was on. She flew around the garden after them. Looking at her you would never think this lovely chow was totally blind. She has never seen the sun or the trees and really has no idea what the cats look like. Many a time, when the cats were well and truly cornered, they would jump over my garden fence. She was not perturbed by their actions and would stand with her two front paws balanced on the fence. She was not perturbed by their actions and would stand with her two front paws balance on the fence "looking" over to see if they were anywhere within reach. While she was still very young, I also got Charlie, a black Maltese Cross Toy Poodle to be her companion. She loved Charlie and when they are together, follows him around the garden. It's like having a guide dog for a blind dog. They have always got on very well together.

Two weeks ago Melushka had to have one of her eyes removed as she had developed glaucoma in it. It was unsightly to look at. I thought it would be better if it were not there at all. She sailed through the operation and although my Vet said it was a difficult operation as the eyeball itself was a big as a golf ball and full of fluid, he thought that infection might set in and that he would have to put her down. But again she proved him wrong and she healed very quickly and was soon getting around even better than before. Without the pain and the weight of a very bad eye, the cats are now even more aware of her. You would never think that she was blind unless you look at her eyes. She is a truly lovely young 18-month-old chow and so far she has coped extremely well with her disability. And I am sure she will cope very well with anything put in her way. On a sad ending note of Melushkas life
I had to put her down at the age of 8 years because she developed cancer in her throat.
Carolyn Dewrance
4 Fernwood Close
Richwood
Cape Town 7441

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cancer (Malignant Histiocytosis)

Post by purpletiger » Fri Apr 22, 2005 6:43 pm

Well this is my first time to this forum as I am in desperate ineed of nformation about the cancer that my 12 year old male (Starkey) has been diagnosed with.
I have been told 5 days ago that he has malignant histiocytosis and has only probably days to live.
The vet has said that it is not responsive to chemo and a very rare disease which she had not come across before.
Has any one heard of this in chows before as the information I have researched does not show this disease in the breed.
This is one of the most painful experiences not knowing when the right time is to let go of them. I don't want to see him in pain but also want to know when the time is right.
If anyone can help with advice or information I would sincerely appreciate it.

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cancer

Post by carolyn dewrance » Fri Apr 22, 2005 9:59 pm

It is so sad to read this, I am so sorry, but I do know how you feel, and please dot be hurt by my advice, dont let her suffer any more, please put her down and remember the good times you had with her and the love that she gave to you, it is your duty to now relieve her of her suffering. below is an artical I got from the encylopidia brittanica on cancer not that it will help but read it anyway.
Love and purple kisses from all my chows
Carolyn Dewrance
South Africa.

a mass of abnormal tissue that arises without obvious cause from preexisting body cells, has no purposeful function, and is characterized by a tendency to autonomous and unrestrained growth. Tumours are quite different from inflammatory or other swellings because the cells in tumours are abnormal in their appearance and other characteristics. Abnormal cells—the kind that generally make up tumours—differ from normal cells in having undergone one or more of the following alterations: (1) hypertrophy, or an increase in the size of individual cells; this feature is occasionally encountered in tumours but occurs commonly in other conditions; (2) hyperplasia, or an increase in the number of cells within a given zone; in some instances it may constitute the only criterion of tumour formation; (3) anaplasia, or a regression of the physical characteristics of a cell toward a more primitive or undifferentiated type; this is an almost constant feature of malignant tumours, though it occurs in other instances both in health and in disease.
In some instances the cells of a tumour are normal in appearance, faithful reproductions of their parent types; the differences between them and normal body cells can be discerned only with some difficulty. Such tumours are more often benign than not. Other tumours are composed of cells that appear different from normal adult types in size, shape, and structure; they usually belong to tumours that are malignant. Such cells may be bizarre in form or be arranged in a distorted manner. In more extreme cases, the cells of malignant tumours are described as primitive, or undifferentiated, because they have lost the appearance and functions of the particular type of (normal) specialized cell that was their predecessor. As a rule, the less differentiated a malignant tumour's cells are, the more quickly may that tumour be expected to grow.
Malignancy refers to the ability of a tumour to ultimately cause death. Any tumour, either benign or malignant in type, may produce death by local effects if it is appropriately situated. The common and more specific definition of malignancy implies an inherent tendency of the tumour's cells to metastasize (invade the body widely and become disseminated by subtle means) and eventually to kill the patient unless all the malignant cells can be eradicated.
Metastasis is thus the outstanding characteristic of malignancy. Metastasis is the tendency of tumour cells to be carried from their site of origin by way of the circulatory system and other channels, which may eventually establish these cells in almost every tissue and organ of the body. In contrast, the cells of a benign tumour invariably remain in contact with each other in one solid mass centred on the site of origin. Because of the physical continuity of benign tumour cells, they may be removed completely by surgery if the location is suitable. But the dissemination of malignant cells, each one individually possessing (through cell division) the ability to give rise to new masses of cells (new tumours) in new and distant sites, precludes complete eradication by a single surgical procedure in all but the earliest period of growth.
A mass of tumour cells usually constitutes a definite localized swelling that, if it occurs on or near the surface of the body, can be felt as a lump. Deeply placed tumours, however, may not be palpable. Some tumours, and particularly malignant ones, may assume physical characteristics other than that of lumps. They may appear as ulcers, indurated cracks or fissures, wartlike projections, or a diffuse, ill-defined infiltration of what appears to be an otherwise normal organ or tissue.
Pain is a variable symptom with tumours. It most commonly results from the growing tumour pressing on adjacent nerve tracts. In their early stages all tumours tend to be painless, and those that grow to a large size without interfering with local functions may remain painless. Eventually, however, most malignant tumours cause pain by the direct invasion of nerve trunks or the destruction of bone.
A benign tumour may undergo malignant transformation, but the cause of such change is unknown. It is also possible for a malignant tumour to remain quiescent, mimicking a benign one clinically, for a long time. The regression of a malignant tumour to benign is unknown, however.
All benign tumours tend to remain localized at the site of origin. Many benign tumours are encapsulated. The capsule consists of connective tissue derived from the structures immediately surrounding the tumour. Well-encapsulated tumours are not anchored to their surrounding tissues. These benign tumours enlarge by accretion, pushing aside the adjacent tissues without involving them intimately. Malignant tumours, by contrast, do not usually possess a capsule; more important for the affected individual, they invade the surrounding tissues, thereby becoming fixed to them and making surgical removal more difficult or risky.
Among the major types of benign tumours are the following: lipomas, which are composed of fat cells; angiomas, which are composed of blood or lymphatic vessels; osteomas, which arise from bone; chondromas, which arise from cartilage; and adenomas, which arise from glands. For malignant tumours, see cancer. For plant tumours, see gall.
Carolyn Dewrance
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Richwood
Cape Town 7441

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"Starkey's" Cancer

Post by purpletiger » Sat Apr 23, 2005 6:51 pm

Thank you Carolyn for your kind advice and information.
Your words have brought me comfort, and yes I owe it to him to not let him suffer any longer. Cancer is trully a cruel disease and no animal deserves to go through this.

Starkey is sleeping at the moment so I thought if I may just tell you and anyone who might want to read this a little bit about him as he is the most wonderful animal and dear friend.

As I mentioned before he is 12 years old and the most beautiful red colour. Even now through his illness his coat is still bright and glows in the sun. I was lucky enough for him to come into my life when he was actually 5 years old when the breeder of my beautiful black female chow contacted me and asked if I would like him as her husband had passed away and she was no longer able to look after all of the dogs. As I was looking for a mate for "Brittney" and also her 1/2 brother I jumped at the chance. Well need less to say we tried for puppies for many years but sadly nothing eventutated. But the best thing of all I gained was Starkey a dear friend and companion.
He talks to me everyday and is still trying now but it is quite laboured. He would know when I would get up in the morning and let out his morning hello in a deep voice. He would do the same when I would drive down the driveway. Sometimes I would wonder what the neighbours thought, but know one has ever complained. He use to love sitting under the trees and barking at the possums and also the odd cat including mine. I'm sure you all know what I mean about their bark as chows make the funniest sound don't they :)
I tried to show him awhile ago but not much success there either, I don't know who was worse at it him or me, so we gave up on that too. But I was able to teach him one trick and that always makes me smile. I ask him to give me his paw and he holds it out to me confidently and with style. I think he is proud that he has mastered this too. We can also change paws so I think that is really cool 8)
The best thing about Starkey is that he is really a loving animal. He would never hurt anyone and definately avoids all confrontations with his sister, it is just not in his nature to fight and will readily give up his dinner if pushed.
I could go on and on, but I just hope there is alitlle bit of Starkey in all chows as he is truely the most beautiful, amasing and sweetest boy.

Thank you again Carolyn for your words and for the kisses from your chows.
Love
Christine Sugden
Australia

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cancer

Post by carolyn dewrance » Sun Apr 24, 2005 7:30 am

Christeen what a lovely story about your Chow and how pleased I am to know that he has given you the most wonderful part of his life, I love the older dogs and have rescued many of them if you read my posts of Dogs in my bed you will read about some of them, I do hope his parting will give you peace as Tanyas gave to me a week ago, she had cance of the bowel if I did not mention it before and was nearly 10 years old, I still have 2 of her daughters to fill the empty space she left when she went to the Chow Showbrounds of heaven, but I will never forget her. It's so nice to write to some one in Australia as my son and his family left South Africa yesterday to immergrate to Australia, they will be staying in Perth. and I will truly miss them.
God Bless and again purple kisses form all my chows.

Carolyn
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Cancer

Post by purpletiger » Tue Apr 26, 2005 4:55 pm

Carolyn I am very sad to hear of your loss last week and hope that you have many happy memories of Tanya.
Unfortunately Starkey passed away yesterday afternoon. He was having a very restless day and a tumour that had come up in his eye in the last couple of days on top of everything else was not helping his comfort. My husband and I realised that this cancer was getting worse at such a rapid rate that it was only fair on him to not let him go through it any more. This was definatelty the worst experience of living with an animal with cancer, they are so very brave. Once again Carolyn your words and own personal experience helped me make th decision of when to let go.
I hope your son and family have a wonderful new life in Perth as it is a lovely city. I come from Brisbane which is on the other side of Australia, but the 2 cities are quite similar in lifestyle and temperature. It has been many years since I have travelled to Perth, but I sincerely hope that they enjoy it and that you will be o.k with their move.

Christine

SWANCIN - Cindy & Kod

Re: Cancer

Post by SWANCIN - Cindy & Kod » Tue Apr 26, 2005 7:10 pm

purpletiger wrote:Carolyn I am very sad to hear of your loss last week and hope that you have many happy memories of Tanya.
Unfortunately Starkey passed away yesterday afternoon. He was having a very restless day and a tumour that had come up in his eye in the last couple of days on top of everything else was not helping his comfort. My husband and I realised that this cancer was getting worse at such a rapid rate that it was only fair on him to not let him go through it any more. This was definatelty the worst experience of living with an animal with cancer, they are so very brave. Once again Carolyn your words and own personal experience helped me make th decision of when to let go.
I hope your son and family have a wonderful new life in Perth as it is a lovely city. I come from Brisbane which is on the other side of Australia, but the 2 cities are quite similar in lifestyle and temperature. It has been many years since I have travelled to Perth, but I sincerely hope that they enjoy it and that you will be o.k with their move.

Christine
Christine,
My sincere condolences for your loss of Dear One Starkey. You have given him the most personal and unselfish gift of all - setting him free of his pained body. He is now running free and happy at the Bridge and you will see him some day-rest assured.
Kindest and warmest regards,
Cindy & Kodi

debbie abd Bones

Starkey

Post by debbie abd Bones » Wed Apr 27, 2005 1:13 pm

I just wanted to add my condolences for the loss of your beautiful and wonderful Chow. I lost my older boy Bear 2 years ago at age 11 years 11 months and feel for you in your time of grief. What special animals these Chows are to give us so much pleasure for so many years yet is seems so short a time that we are with us. Know that your Starkey will be waiting on the other side of the "rainbow bridge" for you to meet again! Debbie and Bones

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Post by carolyn dewrance » Thu Apr 28, 2005 10:13 am

thank you so much Christeen , I know you did the right thing andif you listen carefully you will know that Starkey is still with you in spirit if not in person, Chows are wonderfull animals and even when they are not with us anymore they are still there in our hearts and neve leave our minds, Over the years I have lost many of my beloved chows at one time I had 27 of them no I am not crazy I just love them so much that I wanted to have the biggest kennels in South Africa. And as they have left to walk the heavenly showgrounds I know that they are with me in my times of need. My Son and family arrived saftely in Perth and he has now started to work, I do miss them as they are so far away but I sent them an sms this evening so they really are only a phone call away. God Bless you andyour husband and I do hope you get over your loss.
Carolyn
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Starkey & Thank you

Post by purpletiger » Thu Apr 28, 2005 5:34 pm

Dear Carolyn,Cindy & Kodi, Debbie & Bones,

My husband & I would like to thank you all for your kind words and loving thoughts.
I pray that I will see Starkey again as I miss him terribly. As we have all been through such heart break I realise that we are not alone, and I hope that you too all have wonderful memories of your dear friends.
Starkey will be coming home to me this afternoon as I have had him cremated by Pets in Eternal Peace. They have been very kind through this and I left Starkey in their hands to take care of him until he returns home today.
Once again thank you very much and love to you all and your beautiful chows.
Love Christine & Robert

Carolyn,
You must be an amasing lady to look after so many of them. That sounds like the most wonderful sight, so many chows running around together. I have never heard of a breeder in Australia having that many. I bet you have so many wonderful stories to tell. I am also happy that your family arrived safely in Australia.
Christine

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Post by carolyn dewrance » Fri Apr 29, 2005 10:06 am

Thank you Christine, Yes they are safe in your wonderfull homeland which is now to be their new home and I am sure that theAustralians over there will welome them with open arms, Thank you for your are and bless you and may we converse for a long time through this wonderful site, When Strkey comes home say a little paryer for him from me and hopefully he will meet Tanya on the other side and become her good friend.
Thank you again
Carolyn
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Post by carolyn dewrance » Fri Apr 29, 2005 10:07 am

Thank you Christine, Yes they are safe in your wonderfull homeland which is now to be their new home and I am sure that theAustralians over there will welome them with open arms, Thank you for your are and bless you and may we converse for a long time through this wonderful site, When Strkey comes home say a little paryer for him from me and hopefully he will meet Tanya on the other side and become her good friend.
Thank you again
Carolyn
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I think my Chow has cancer

Post by MybabyBear » Thu Jun 09, 2005 8:17 pm

Hi, I need some help. Recently, my mom and I noticed that our chow, Bear, didn't look quite right. Tonight, we gave him a through exam. He has a huge pus-like pocket on his right elbow, smaller pockets on his tail and back, small red spots between his toes on both front feet, and hair missing on his underbelly. He has been suffering from severia (high form of mange) for several years now, so he has been missing most of his hair since he was about 3 (in human years). It kind of helps us to see the pockets. The one on his elbow is very painful to him since he flinches everytime we touch an area around it. He seems to have no problems or pain walking. The pocket on his elbow is firm, but not completely solid. There's a red dot on it, but when squeezed won't let anything out. He has been licking at his toes for a year, and about a year ago his right paw bled severely for no reason. Please help me....my chow will be 9 in November, and I don't want to lose him. He's my friend, my little sister's guardian angel, and my almost 3 year old Norwegian Elk Hound's best friend.....:'( Stephanie, Bear, and family

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cancer

Post by purpletiger » Thu Jun 09, 2005 9:55 pm

Hi Stephanie,
I am very sorry to hear of Bear's illness. I have just recently lost my dear friend Starkey to cancer, but from the symptoms you have explained they appear different to his. I am unsure of what this might be with your Bear, but probably recommend a check up with the Vet and probably some samples taken from these suspect areas. With my Starkey we took 6 samples from different lumps, which was quite simple and appeared painless, just like a little needle prick. They sent this away to the University of Queensland in Australia which cost about AUS$190 and the results were back in less then a week. I hope your town has the same facilities. Unfortunately for us the results were not good and it turned out to be a rare form of cancer. I did some research and Starkey's type is not common in Chows.
Staphanie I really feel for you through this time as all you want to do is take their pain away.
To let you know as well, I turned to this site just like you when I needed help and there are some lovely people here with also great advice and words of comfort. Carolyn from SAfrica was especially kind and very knowledgeable, so please read her information as this helped me.
Take care and all my love to your family and Bear in this difficult time.
Love
Christine (Australia)

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Post by MybabyBear » Fri Jun 10, 2005 6:51 am

Christine-
Thanks for your reply. I was reading some of the other posts on here last night.....it sounded like Starkey was a great Chow. Our vet is 25 minutes away, but works certain days and times at that clinic as she works at another one 30 minutes away, which makes it imposible to make an appointment. I want to just walk him down there myself, (I've had to carry him before....he was standing in the middle of an intersection looking for me because I went for a walk and didn't know he was out). I told my dad about it this morning, but he said,"There's nothing we can do....if it's something that serious, what can we do?" I wanted to cry when he said that. But I can understand why he said it. This isn't the first time we've had a dog with cancer. Kali, my guardian angel, had firm pus pockets too, but just on her shoulder and they would open, unlike Bear. She had 2 surgeries, but when more spots broke out, we let it go. She died under our deck, her favorite place, the day after I came back from a camp. I really don't want to go through this again. I hope that if it is cancer, I can get help from u.

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Re: I think my Chow has cancer

Post by Zhuyos mom » Fri Jun 10, 2005 6:39 pm

MybabyBear wrote:He has a huge pus-like pocket on his right elbow, smaller pockets on his tail and back, small red spots between his toes on both front feet....
Hi Stephanie -

Why do you suspect cancer? Perhaps the little pockets you are describing are simple sebaceous cysts. He's 9 and most senior dogs/chows are prone to sebacious cysts. In simple terms they are big blackheads and pimples on the chows skin. Don't pop them as it may cause infection. Let them pop on their own. Typically, they dry up a little internally and then they'll open up to shed the excess skin, which is usually dark in color. When my Zhu turned 9, I noticed more and more sebacious cysts on him. At 13.5, he has plenty. He also lives with cancer. Having had a huge malignant lump on his abdomen removed in 2001 and just last summer recurrances of more masses. Our vet advises me that if the lumps are solid, then those are the ones you must tend to with a vet immediately. The hard masses are typically cancerous. The softer ones with gooey guck are often sebacious cysts and clear up on their own. So please don't pop them!

Now regarding the bumps on his paws, that could also be his seborrhea. Does he roam around your backyard alot? Maybe there is a grass or weed that he is very sensitive to. Licking his paw made his paw bleed. It's their way to to both clean and "bandage" their wound.... at least that's what I've heard (that their saliva aids in healing). But my experience is that it opens it up more. What do you wash him with? Do you put any form of flea powder or fragrance on him? Just things to think about.

You really should make an appointment with your vet. It's much better to be safe than sorry. My chows are on prescription food for their allergies. Maybe you can see if your vet can supply you with a small bag and test if it helps Bear. The one Zhu and Pooh Bear are on is Hill's Prescription Z/D ULTRA. It is their "uber" allergy meal. Hill's is 100% returnable... so if it doesn't work out, return the unused portion to your vet and they will reimburse.

Good luck!

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Post by MybabyBear » Fri Jun 10, 2005 9:30 pm

Lou-
My guess is that my parents and I thought that it was cancer because Kali had cancer and had spots like Bear. How can I tell if Bear is shedding? I wish I could put a picture on here showing how much of his hair is gone. He does roam around our backyard, then again he eats grass. Actually, we don't wash him. Our bathroom is too small, he hates water except for drinking, and dislikes having hand contact, (until recently). I'll try to talk my dad into the appointment....he thinks we should just "Let Mother Nature take its course." Stephanie and Bear

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Post by Zhuyos mom » Fri Jun 10, 2005 11:12 pm

Hi again, Stephanie -

Oh boy, we do have a problem here if your dad wants Mother Nature to take its course. Some dads think that way. It can be frustrating. However, perhaps with your Mom, you can talk him into taking Bear to the vet. Because truly, you should get him to a doctor. I can give you some more stuff to think about like does your parents use weed killer or pesticide on your grass - the one Bear nibbles on, what does Bear eat (maybe he's not getting enough of the right vitamins, since he doesn't get washed, have you been able to groom him enough where you can see and get rid of any foxtails or flea and ticks that might be nipping at him, and is Bear an outside chow 24/7? He seems to be having lots of different symptoms of this and that. But nothing we can share with you or give you advice, can take the place of what a good vet's exam will tell you. I know you would want to actually know what is wrong with Bear.

If you brush a chow daily for 15 minutes, shedding won't be so bad. My two shed heavily twice a year. But there is always lots of fur hair around and I am always on my knees picking the knots up. It's mostly Pooh Bear's hair because she's soooo furry! I also take them to the groomers to help them not shed. Other's may have different ways to explain how to know when a chow sheds, but for me it's when I start finding clumps of their undercoat lying around, especially when they've had a good scratch.

So keep us posted on what's going on. You can put a photo of Bear on your post. I've posted lots of pictures of Pooh Bear. I think there are instructions on the site where the administrator posts to us. Basically, you need to have a host photo site to hold you photo, copy the address, paste it on your post, highlight it and press the menu button "Img" on the page. Sounds harder than it really is.

Take care,

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MybabyBear
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Post by MybabyBear » Sat Jun 11, 2005 6:40 am

Hi again Lou-

My mom and I want to take Bear to the vet. However, we can't for 2-3 weeks as my mom is on the wrong shift and I'm gone. Just hopefully nothing goes seriously wrong. We don't use pesticide on our grass. The grass Bear likes is a long blade, kind of like bluegrass, I think. Bear eats Member's Mark Exceed Lamb and Rice formula dog food, plus whatever we stick his pills into, (mostly fat scraps and ham- vet said fat would help). He's a fussy eater, as for a time he wouldn't even eat things that fell on the floor. (Two little sisters ages 5 and 6......the dogs eat whatever they don't from their dinner.)

We don't really groom him either. Not too much to groom. But we give him a complete exam for ticks, since it's really easy for them to latch onto him now. He isn't an outside dog 24/7. I'm not sure exactly how much he is out, since he must come in and out each time the door opens.

Also, he doesn't shed. He hasn't shed in at least 5 years. Homer, our Norwegian Elk Hound, sheds year round. I g2g.....Stephanie and Bear

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