Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Training and behavior topics, guidelines, and tips for Chow Chows.

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Rory's Dad
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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Rory's Dad » Thu Feb 23, 2012 5:26 pm

MissV, i dont think you have to be bitten...there are other options. I have had to muzzle one of my dogs for vet visits (and i blame the vet, not the dog). He didnt take kindly to it and it was a negative experience. I dont have any actual experience with a positive muzzle experience, but i have heard it can be done. Just a thought.

Not so sure about a stare down as mentioned in Cam's post. If Slush looks away 1st, then thats ok as you've established some dominance. On the other hand, you dont want to give Slush an opportunity to do the same. Extended eye contact with a chow means a lot more to them than it does you. I do agree with the vet that taking a commanding stance is a good approach.

My suggestion about hands on was intended to help determine if her reaction was to one of pain/discomfort as compared to just rejecting the bath. If she is just butt planting without the bath in sight, i think that answers that question. She is reacting to not wanting a bath and its not that she is being hurt.

Rory is still young enough that we pick him up for various reasons (he wont go down the steps from the 2nd floor, up is ok, down not so much). He is comfortable with it, so that makes it easier. He is quickly approaching a weight that only i can do it, but my daughter still picks him up and puts him on her lap. I am amazed at the things he allows that girl to do. I dont even think he would allow me to lay him on his back in the recliner and pose him like a rag doll, but he does for her. My point is that frequent handling might help. If Slush is used to being handled and picked up, she might not see that bath coming, or might associate some positive experiences with it (til she hits the water at least).

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Yvonne » Thu Feb 23, 2012 7:10 pm

I've been thinking about this today, and have a couple of other things I'll throw out for discussion.

I think some of these are low probability in this case, but maybe if we all keep thinking and talking long enough, we will stumble on something, even if by accident! :)

Is it possible the choke collar really hurt Slush a little bit - I mean like a nerve or something? You mentioned the trainer used it pretty hard. I don't think that is likely, and especially since she seems to be fine and not in any pain as long as she doesn't have to do anything she doesn't feel like doing at the time. I think if a nerve was sensitive, the playing in the park would have also been painful at times. I just know I hurt a nerve in my leg one time by exercising, and it took a few weeks to go away.

It might be on a post someplace and I didn't look, but was your little Slush a rescue pup or from a breeder? I'm thinking of any potential neurological problems. Sometimes in humans you will hear of an underlying neurological problem being brought to the surface by a bad or stressful experience. I was wondering if you knew if any of her parents or grandparents had any problems?
If that is the case, sometimes medication can help.

If Slush got this upset over the choke collar, it's possible she will always have issues with anything that even looks like a choke collar in the future. That isn't really a problem as long as you are aware of it. Chows have a very long memory, and when they really get full fledged ticked off (as opposed to the regular snorting, harumphing, laying with the butt to you because they can irritated) a lot of times it sticks for life. Just something you might want to think about.

I agree with the others that mentioned maybe getting a muzzle.
I'm normally not in favor of muzzles on our own dogs, except in cases of emergency or a wounded dog that is in pain, but you may want to get one. I don't think it's necessarily the best option to use very often because it is likely to further irritate Slush, but you may need it to feel at ease moving her if you absolutely have to use it. Muzzles don't help much to build the type of relationships we want with our chowkids, but sometimes they are necessary.

I think it's completely normal to be leary now that you have been bitten - any of us would feel that way. Something you might consider using to help you is a pair of those long BBQ mitts. They are padded somewhat like a potholder, come up the arm quite a ways to protect against BBQ heat, and would help to keep any teeth that may encounter your arm from making contact with your skin. That way you could handle Slush with more confidence until she gets past this stage.

Just some stuff I was thinking about today while I was at work.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by MissV » Fri Feb 24, 2012 3:15 am

AWESOME! thanks guys for more advice!
Rory's dad: yea, when slush was little - we used to be able to help her down the stairs. She just couldnt get down. Its so cute! We had to teach her how. ANYWHOO, we used to pick her up LOTS when we could. We used to pick her up and hug her and and and... yea, you get the idea. We loved her much to much as a pup.
Shes much too big for us to pick her up now unless we have to. Shes sitting at 18kgs (40lbs).
We're def not hurting her when we pick her up. Its just that she HATES water. And bath and dip time are worse than anything in the world to her. I can even cut the hair between her toes and brush her teeth, but water... forget it.
I wont get into a staring competition with my dog. I agree with that. I will do what you say though and step closer. The fact that sunday is 2 days away is FREAKING me out! I really dont want to go through that dip again!

Muzzling my dog is not an option for me. I just wont do it. Shes not rabbid. Shes just naughty... and i dont want to live in fear of my dog :( or her of me.

Yvonne - thanks for thinking of some more tips! I like your BBQ mitt idea :) Pity we dont have any here in South Africa!! :( We do have oven gloves tho, albiet a little shorter than BBQ mitts, I will use your idea and use my oven gloves!!!! I think for me it will relax me more knowing that she cant really hurt me. Maybe i should just wrap myself in a mattress. LOL! SpongeBob Chow Pants, anyone?
WRT her origins, we got her from friends of friends of ours. I had met the parent dogs a few times. Both were awesome. Never a horrible bone in thier body (just like Slush is with other people). I dont know why shes reacting badly now.
Yesterday we went to the dog park again... I dont think any nerves were pinched when she was jerked around because she has been fine on her lead and is still rearing to go for walkies. Anyway, we let her off her lead for a little while and her recall was actually pretty good.

So you see my predicament here? I have such a good dog 90% of the times. I can even let her off the lead!!!! BUT, when it comes to getting her to do things she hates, she just goes mental.
Her defiance is the problem here.
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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by chowpups » Fri Feb 24, 2012 3:57 am

I will say that Nikki had no problems with bathing but you could not get her into our pool. Everyone told me she should learn the pool steps incase she fell in it took my son, husband and myself to get her in and that was the last time she ever went in and it was disaster I must say. We tried nicely with good treats but finally had to pick her up and carry her in squirming around. now we found out later she loved the creeks where she could go in gradually but never again the pool which was great no dog fur in the pool filter.
my daughters shar pei had demodex mange and did the dips but the Vet did them, but his skin was sore and Iam sure the dip meds stung a little , he was good but didn't care for the dips. I hope things get better it's so trusting the d.mange for all.
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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by oceans » Fri Feb 24, 2012 6:17 am

I just had an idea when I read Chowpups comment on their vet doing the dips. Maybe your vet can dip her once a week if that is an option for you. That way she won't associate you with doing something bad to her. Then she would have no reason to bite you. One thing I do know is Chows do not forget. If they don't like something, they don't like something. There is no convincing. I actually was bitten by my past chow for bathing her. I had given her a bath every month for the first 8 months with no problems. She didn't necessarily love it but she tolerated it. As I went to get her once again for her bath I started to pick her up and she laid in to my face and caused me to have several, several stitches. This came from a dog that as stated before I bathed every month and she had never even acted like she wanted to bite. She did not growl, or show any signs of going to bite. I say this because if Slush is truely not wanting a bath, the results eventually may not turn out to good for you. Slush sounds like an awesome dog I just think she is tellling you I don't like this.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by chowpups » Fri Feb 24, 2012 8:18 am

My daughter was pregnant at the time that's why the vet did the dips but it was better the vet doing them cause it didn't put the association with her personally. I do think that is the best to do if you can do it that way. I just know her dogs skin was inflamed an Iam sure it's stressful to them just dealing with the mange.
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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Cocoa » Fri Feb 24, 2012 9:56 am

Cocoa hates it when I give her a bath as well. When she was little she tolerated it but as she got bigger it got harder to wrestle her into the tub. Now that she is a full grown 65 lb. chow there is no way I could get her into the tub by myself so I take her in to the groomer. I have a groomer who is chow experienced and she has no problem giving Cocoa a bath. Is there any way you could get either a groomer or your vet to do the weekly dips?

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Yvonne » Fri Feb 24, 2012 6:16 pm

Miss V,

Really, I agree with you on the muzzle. I always refused to use one, too, on my own chowkid because it wasn't the relationship I wanted.

The first time I even thought about getting one was when we were in the basement and a tornado passed by very close, and I started thinking that if it had hit and we needed help out of the basement, it could be very stressful for Brandon (my chow) and he could also be injured and in pain, and a stranger may have to help us out of the basement. So I bought one to put in the "stormpack" I take to the basement with us when a tornado warning is out.

Other than that, I also refused to use one.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Yvonne » Fri Feb 24, 2012 6:23 pm

Or maybe she's just trying to test you to see if you love her enough to put up with all this :D

If so, when she decides she is yours no matter what, she will quit and go back to being her lovable self 100% of the time.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Victory » Sun Feb 26, 2012 4:04 pm

First of all, that trainer totally blew it. Using a choke collar harshly on any dog with mange is quite painful. She hurt her badly, and you let it happen. Slush is angry and she has lost trust in you. You need to work on regaining that trust. Chows have very long memories for painful, hurtful experiences, (it's part of the reason they have to so carefully rehomed) Secondly, there is NOTHING wrong with using a muzzle in some situations. It is better that she not bit, ever. Once she starts warning or fear biting, she will escalate, because she'll think, "dummy isn't paying attention to a warning nip, so I'll use a strong bit." You want to minimize the drama, (truama) of the bathing.

Work on bonding with her again, take her out with just you and/or your boyfriend, make being with you fun again. Use NILF training with her, to reinforce your leadership with her. DO NOT yell at her, you'll only make her shy of raised voices. A chow is smarter than that and they don't need to be yanked around, yelled at or hit, ever! Respect, patience, persistence, those are the qualities that make calm, confident and happy chows.
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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Rory's Dad » Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:18 pm

Well stated Victory...part of my post on the muzzle was to make sure its not a negative experience. I personally, have not done this, as my only muzzle experience was to try to save a not so Chow savvy vet from biting, but i know it can be done.

I am a strong believer in positive (only) training. It takes work and you must be consistent. Chows do have that long memory, and they dont forget. Better to not give her a negative memory to deal with.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by MissV » Mon Feb 27, 2012 1:08 am

Hi again everyone,
Just some feedback - Victory: I spend loads of one on one time with my baby. We walk twice a day and we hit the dog park 2 / 3 times a week, as well as (when shes in the mood for it) throw her fave teddy around the room :)
I think however, im getting too much different advice from too many people and its driving me nuts!
I have no doubt in my mind that slush has shut down to that trainer. This weekend proved it. I will complete these rounds of lessons (because ive paid for them) but when this is over - thats it. No more.
I dont need my dog to heel perfectly, and Im not showing my dog or doing agility training comps with her - so no point in carrying on. She gets socialized at the dog park and thats good enough for me.
I made a point of chatting to the trainer privately this weekend. I told her about the biting and her shutting down with the new training session... i must say, the trainer backed off Slush A LOT!
I cant train with the other dogs anymore tho, cos Slush refuses to perform at school. So we get to walk around the training field. Yay. Fun (NOT!)
The trainer is obsessed in gettin slush to heel.... and slush's focus goes right out the window at school, which makes the trainer mad at her.

So we had to dip again this weekend. We got growled at - so i sprayed slush in the face with the hose. Probably not the best since shes scared of water, but its better than being bitten!
It took my boyfriend and I to grab her and plop her into the tub outside which we use for dipping.
Luckily - there was no biting this time! (the hose saved us, we're convinced!)
We dont have the option of letting the vet dip her because they dont do that here... and dog groomers sedate dogs here, so i dont want a drugged up puppy.

I know that chows dont forget - but this is something she's going to have to learn... We're not hurting her. Sure it probably stings, but once this is over - its over forever!
ps. she also hates the pool, we tried to show her the stair thing when she was small, and that was just one helluva disaster. Its like shes hated water since before we got her! Shame :(
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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Laura » Mon Feb 27, 2012 11:36 am

2 comments
First of all listen to Victory, she knows what she is talking about.
Secondly why in the world would you subject your pet to a trainer whose methods you say you don't approve of and who 'really uses the choke chain' in the first place much less keep going and traumatizing your pet further simply because it is already paid for. Damage and more damage! Tell the trainer where to stick the choke chain and get the heck out of there! You want a mean untrusting Chow? Keep up the choke chain, and jerking, and dominating training.
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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Cocoa » Mon Feb 27, 2012 3:08 pm

Laura I totally agree with both your points. Victory is giving very good advice, listen to her. Also to continue with a trainer that not only do you not agree with but that is traumatizing your chow just because you have paid for the sessions is nuts. Yes you may be out a few dollars but it is just money, any damage the trainer does with your dog will be difficult, if not impossible to rectify.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by oceans » Mon Feb 27, 2012 3:17 pm

Excellant comments Victory, Laura, Cocoa. One comment- spraying your chow in the face is very, very disrespectful. This will get you nowhere with her trust.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by MissV » Tue Feb 28, 2012 12:29 am

omg. PEOPLE! calm down!
first of all... my dog was on a choke chain ONCE! I never EVER used it on her again. When she goes to classes, she uses her normal leather collar and nylon lead. I like to take her to classes, because SLUSH actually loves playing with the other dogs... and every other excerse (like stays and recall). They do her wonders there.
The only thing i disapprove of is the way the trainer wants me to walk my dog.

SHEESH!

also, im getting a bit upset with everyone... first, its "dont hit your dog" then its "dont spray your dog in the face" then its "dont yell at your dog" SERIOUSLY! do you people dicipline your pets at all?!?!
I cant send her for a time out all the time, because she wont always go in her crate. I'm not going to push her into it, because i'm afraid she'll bite me for forcing her to do something she doesnt want to do.
So really now... clapping my hands doesnt work to get her to stop... making loud noises doesnt help...
really, what do you people want me to do?

this is exhasperating to say the least!

I appreciate the advice at the beginning of this forum, but now it seems a dead horse is being flogged.
Also, Oceans - your comment freaked the living *Censored Word* out of me. I always hug my dog and i always smoosh her face on mine and we always give each other loves... yesterday when i was giving her love before going to bed... i freaked out as i remembered your comment with the stitches... as well as that other guys post about his chow just biting for no reason.
If this forum has done anything, its made me fear my chow.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by TyChowgirl » Tue Feb 28, 2012 4:01 am

Okay. I'm going to stick my neck out here. Tiberius isn't perfect and he's my first Chow chow and really, my first puppy/dog as an adult. It took us a while to feel each other out. I have used a slip chain (because that's what it's really called) on Ty as a negative reinforcement because other things hadn't worked. I had him on a no pull harness when a puppy. I had him trained to walk next to me and then one day, out the window and he was pulling me like crazy. After trying to re-teach everything and lots of patience, he still wasn't do anything, but trying to walk me instead. Chow mentality or not, I refuse to let that happen because he was going to get bigger and letting him drag me around the neighborhood was another sign of who was in charge. Also, walking him is also taking him to the bathroom because I live in an apartment. So I bought the slip chain, used it the way it was supposed to be used and only when he wouldn't abide by the harness. He got the message quick. And honestly, after he got scared and tried to bolt and it pulled his fur enough to cause damage because they're not long haired dog friendly, I stopped using it because at that point he had started to get back in the routine of walking correctly. I also felt guilty, but I didn't know a skate board would scare him enough to do that. I also think there's a difference between a quick light smack or whatever you want to call it and beating your dog. It's like with children. At a certain age some will smack you and no matter what you say, they'll still do it until you smack them back and they realize it doesn't feel fantastic. You don't wail on them, but a quick light smack back to surprise them with. It's not cruel. Beating your child is cruel. Beating your dog is cruel. There is in my mind a difference and maybe that makes me look like a jerk in some eyes, but Ty has become a very well behaved dog with mild temperament especially for his age. And that I owe to him not getting away with stuff. With nipping, I still have the ocassional issue when he gets excited and wants to play which I have addressed with a yelp (didn't do anything for him) with time out (worked to get it out of him when he was nipping all the time) but he doesn't do it to anyone else and he doesn't actually bite down, his teeth kind of scrape at times. He gets a sharp NO which is yelling at your dog in a way. But there's a difference between yelling and screaming and like children, dogs need to know the difference in your vocals, even chows. He has pretty well stopped it too. Yes, they're special and difficult and independent etc. Agreed. But he's not going to get special treatment from me because of it, I've just had to find other ways to train him than normal because of the stubborn. Again, just my opinion...
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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Cam Atis » Tue Feb 28, 2012 5:01 am

We humans treat dogs human-like and expect the unexpected. They are dogs and dogs bite. But biting has reasons. Yours is known already. Slush doesnt want to bath coz she'd eventually be dipped - period. Chows protect those that they cherish. They were bred to protect their people. So I dont think Slush will ever attack you out of the blue MissV, 100% sure so long as she sees you as her friend and mum.
Only psychotic dogs bite WITHOUT promptings or reasons. These dogs, they are fine most days, BUT...Some days they don't think straight. I've seen most, being a dog lover since I was a child and i got several Askals as I grew up.
Your Slush is not psychotic, was just protesting as a dog and since she can't tell you that, so she growls and lightly bites you, thus letting you know how she feels - that is a warning. Nothing to be wary about - but keep a tab on it in your mind. she had her reason. Give it to her. Listen to her. She's not being bossy, she just tells you she is scared of being dipped. As you said, she doesnt like pools either. If I were you, NO MORE DIP nor baths as of yet. Let her rest coz the mange is really itchy and irritating her so much. She still loves you and she lets you cuddle her. Dont be wary of her. Listening to our dogs doesnt mean we are their subordinates. Give her some slack. She'll forget about it. Normal dogs remembers NOT JUST THE NEGATIVE, BUT ALSO THE POSITIVE. We have a saying in our dialect: Sometimes a dog is better than humans, you feed the dog, they'll learn you are master, feed ingrate humans, next thing you know, they want to eat your whole arm. It is not a good saying but sometimes it is true.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by oceans » Tue Feb 28, 2012 9:50 am

Miss V- My apologies. My intentions were not to freak you out. They were to let you know what possibly could happen. Not that it would. It's called a precaution. Dogs do bite, even non psychotic dogs. That's because, oh my, their dogs!!!! This forum is for anyone to write in with issues to try to help with a problem that was posted or just laugh at a funny story that his/her chow did. You can expect to have different opinions on raising a dog because everybody does it differently. You posted, we replied. Since you feel that a dead horse is being flogged I would only suggest you move on and do what you think is right for Slush. Ultimately that is only what everyone was trying to help you with anyway.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Sirchow » Tue Feb 28, 2012 10:58 am

Maybe it would be better to start another thread here. I dont think it is particularly helpful for everyone to have their say and for someone to feel so got at that they are not comfortable posting and asking for help if they wanted it.
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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Jdcell100 » Tue Feb 28, 2012 11:12 am

I used a firm NO when he was a puppy when my chow did something wrong and that's all it took now 16 months later if he ever dose anything wrong and by the way he never dose all I have to say is NO Once and he stops doing whatever he was doing wrong he is the bet dog in the world I don't know why anyone would own any other breed

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Thomas » Tue Feb 28, 2012 4:32 pm

OK, it's much after the fact, but here's our experience with discipline. Teddie likes it. When we don't run her through her commands on a regular basis she gets sulky and starts acting up, not coming when called, etc. She's three now and still needs to be shown who's in charge. It makes her feel better. We do the ones that she understands the reason for; sit, down (lie down), stay, up (I make her put her paws on my chest), off (get down from anything), wait (different purpose from stay). I've tried shake several times but because she doesn't see a need for it she doesn't do it. Not a big deal. Our mixed breed (Arleigh-Burke) loves to shake hands. We're also very strict with food. I put a treat in my palm but they're not allowed to take it until given a release command. Same thing with meals. It doesn't matter if it's in the bowl. If they don't have permission they don't eat. We also don't let them go through a doorway until they sit and wait for the release command.

Which brings me to HEEL. Teddie weighs sixty-five pounds. Roberta can't control a sixty-five pound dog pulling on a leash. The slack leash idea is OK but it can get her into trouble in an urban environment. A trick I read about on line turned out to be very useful. With Teddie on the leash I say heel and start walking. If she starts to pull ahead I just stop walking and stand there. She can't move forward and stops, letting the leash go slack. I start walking again. If she again puts strain on the leash I stop walking. I don't say anything, just stand there. The first few times we did this it took twenty minutes to go twenty feet. Now both of them know that pulling isn't allowed. Teddie will do heel off of the leash in the yard now but when we're on the sidewalk there's just too many distractions for that. Neither of our dogs is ever off of the leash outside of the yard.

Choke chains - not on a Chow.

Snapping or growling - didn't happen often in the first year and not at all since then. A sharp NO and she was put in the "down" position for thirty seconds. If it keeps up I'd grab her snout and give her a little shake. When she settled down I'd let her up and walk away.

Biting - Teddie has bitten two people in her life. One was me while trying to intervene with another dog that got too agressive (my fault in other words) and the other was a friend who accidentally backed her into a corner (a nipped calf on that one). Both times I believe she did it for a good reason and I couldn't see correcting her over that. My experience has been that she does it if she's got a good reason and I accept her judgment in those cases.

Oh, and she likes to go out onto the deck and bark at the neighborhood in general a couple of times a night. One bark. Sort of an, "I'm here. Don't mess with this house." Arleigh-Burke is the barker and we've dona a lot of work in that arena with her but that is not a Chow problem so I'll refrain.

My two cents.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Rory's Dad » Tue Feb 28, 2012 5:39 pm

i like Thomas's post. Similar to what i do in a lot of aspects. Particularly with the walking/pulling issue. Once they realize pulling actually slows them down or prevents him from getting somewhere, this should stop. But it does takes consistency, just like any training.

A sharp no is a good idea. Also, i have used the water sprayer on my other chows. A fine mist really gets their attention. Eventually, all i had to do was pick up the sprayer and that was enough to stop any unwanted behavior.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by Ursa's daddy » Wed Feb 29, 2012 8:27 pm

I also like Thomas' post. I agree with reinforcing the commands, but I see that as a part of NILF. My two don't heel, but I walk both of them together holding the leads in just one hand. I weigh about 145 lbs (66kg) so I am not that big. They get to pulling, and I stop, and they are told to sit down. It seems to work. I agree about the trainer and the collar. Sounds like Slushy didn't like that.
I don't have a problem with baths for my two, but our last dog was a husky. She would swim in the pond or a ditch if she got a chance, but get a water hose and soap, and she got upset. She would whine like we were really abusing her. Some dogs do not like a bath.
We have gotten a bit far afield with the discussion.
Long story short - this dog is challenging my authority now. She very rarely does what shes told, and due to her mange, we are still dipping her once a week. Yesterday was dipping day, and then it came time to get her into the tub, she growled at me (i was horrified!) and then lashed out and bit me when i tried to pick her up.
Miss V and Slushy have a problem. I have tried to understand the whole thing, and my understanding is that the dog does not like to be dipped and is objecting by growling and nipping. This is not good. Miss V, her BF and Slushy are going to have to get together and determine what exactly is the issue.
Let's divide the problem into a number of small steps. Is the problem that of being picked up? You can try to pick her up when there is no tub in sight. If this is a problem, then you will have to break the act of picking her up down into smaller steps. If this is not a problem, then practice picking her up several times a day. The objective is to condition her to being picked up as an independent process not related to anything else. You want her to learn that most of the times when she is picked up, nothing bad happens, and that being picked up is a normal event, and nothing to fear. There is going to be lots of repetitions and lots of "good dog" said every time things go well. You want the dog to know that you have a positive response when she acts properly. You then have to introduce her to the tub. All you want to happen is for her to see the tub. "Slushy, this is the tub. Tub, this is Slushy." This may take some creative thinking. You may want to put a treat by the tub and then walk away and wait for Slushy to pick up the treat. You want Slushy to develop a neutral response to the sight and proximity of the tub. Again, lots of repetitions. DON'T force it. Once you get this accomplished, you have to pick her up beside the tub, and put her down in the same location that you picked her up. Give her praise every time she does not have a negative response, and mix in treats from time to time. You want praise to the the reinforcer. Once she gets used to this, then put her in the empty tub. In each step, back off if she has a negative response. Give the training a rest. The idea is to make each step non-stressful. Of course, the next step is to put enough water to cover the bottom of the tub. Given enough time and effort, you could train her to come jump in the tub. I think you will consider success will be if she will let you pick her up and put her in the dip without growling and biting. This is textbook conditioning. I think I have done a reasonable job of explaining it. The problem is that this is not a quick process, especially if the dog has some negative experiences which have to be overcome.
Good luck. This is the best I can come up with. Each dog and each situation is specific. You are going to have to get Slushy to explain to you why she is behaving in the manor that she is behaving. Keep us posted.

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Re: Teenage Chow Challenging Authority

Post by MissV » Wed Feb 29, 2012 11:10 pm

AH! thank you! finally, some SOLID advice without crapping me out for being the worlds worst dog owner!!!!!
I will def try what you have suggested. Thank you so much.
I'm a little scared to pick her up because i think she may try to bite me. Shes associated being picked up with dips, baths and the vet's table. All yucky things. I used to pick her up to get into the car, but she knows getting into the car means school or park and that = FUN! so she just jumps right in now.

When i try pick her up now just to pick her up (because I did try to get her used to me just picking her up), she plonks her bum on the floor, and the first chance she has, she runs away.
How do i get her to get used to me trying to pick her up without all this drama?
I have a feeling this whole process is going to take months! :( oh well, if it must be done, then in must be done!
Pure is the heart of an animal - Evil is the heart of man...

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