Concerned......Please Help!!

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Concerned......Please Help!!

Post by Guest » Sat Nov 05, 2005 1:30 pm

For some reason Chingy keeps growling at my 5 year old. She never does anything to him but if she tries to hold him, He will growl at her. I can't have this and so I need to know what to do to get him to stop. Should she feed him? I really need to know what to do to make him respect her. I absolutely cannot have a dog that is growling at my girls. I do not want to have to rehome him or anything like that, I really want to work with him. I really need some help.
Last edited by Guest on Sat Nov 05, 2005 4:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Rogansmommy » Sat Nov 05, 2005 2:05 pm

Chowlings usually get overlooked as puppies because they are so well-behaved. Remember, he will grow up and they were bred to be aloof and independent. If you are already talking about even considering rehoming him, then I question your devotion to this breed.

Realize that a Chow that doesn't want to be held will communicate that. So #1: stop letting your five year old hold Ching. He doesn't like it. As Ching gets older, you need to train your children how to behave around him as well. He is an animal and has a mind of his own. They need to learn that he is not a stuffed animal or a toy. Most dog bites occur because people force the dog into a situation where they feel they have to bite. Don't set Ching up.

Second, you really need to enroll Ching in an obedience class. He needs to learn some basic manners and begin to understand where people stand in his pack. My five year old grew up around Rogue and Nina. Everyone learned to adjust, Rogue especially, since he is my dog. But we all got through it and now we have a happy 8 year old chow, a happy 7 year old rottie and a happy, well-educated five year old boy.
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Post by Guest » Sat Nov 05, 2005 2:32 pm

Okay, Chi-Ching is enrolled in obedience but it won't start until January. That is the soonest the next class starts. My daughters knows how to behave around animals, we have always had animals and they have been around them since they were born, we did alot of foster care for fearful dogs and hard to place dogs, litters of kittens, and pregnant cats. My kids are behaving properly. Chi-Ching will growl at Makaylah even when she tries to pet him. I am very devoted to the chow breed, I work with a chow rescue and also my shelter in placing chows and chow mixes. I have researched this breed for a long time but chow or not, my animals are not allowed to growl at my kids. We have a ZERO tolerance for any show of aggression unless it was brought on for a legit reason.
I just want to know how to make Chingy see her as someone higher in the pack that he has to respect. I love chows but I will not tolerate him growling at her when she is just trying to pet him. He never growls at me or my husband or my 3 year old daughter. My 5 year old is very upset that Chingy doesn't like her. I never let my girls play with the dogs unsupervised, and it is not that Chingy doesn't like to be pet, he just doesn't like her petting him. I just need to know how to get them to get along better. My daughter always asks me if she can pet him first, she never just reaches for him. I will usually pick him up and he just sits there and lets Caitlyn(my 3 year old) pet him but he growls at my 5 year old. I really need to know what is going on with him because as he is only a puppy now, I will not trust him at all as an adult if this doesn't get fixed.

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Post by Taz » Sat Nov 05, 2005 4:48 pm

First of all. Do not punish him for this behavier.
(I'm not saying you are, but just in case. :) )
Have anything bad happend to Ching?
Somebody stepped on him (Not on purpose)
or anything like that?
Have he had any bad experience at all when you first brought him home?

First of all you should reward him whenever he doesn't growl.
And let him assosiate your daughter with something positive.
So you should teach your daughter that Ching should come to her, and not her to him.
She can use the dog language.
Whenever she is around him she should jawn, look away, and have something he really likes. (like a toy, or his favourite food)
Jawning means that "I'm not a threat", and so does turning the head away.

Jawning is a very good signal. It calms the dog down.
Whenever a dog is gonna jump up on me to say hello, I always turns my head and jawn, the effect on that is that the dog instantly stops, and turn his head away and does something else.
But the dog must not have lost his language, or he will not understand.

Did you understand any of this? I'm not so good explaining things in english.

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Post by Guest » Sat Nov 05, 2005 4:59 pm

Nothing bad has happened to him that I know of, I am with him all the time and the kids are good at letting me know if something happens.
We were working tonight with her sitting in the corner and I at the other side of the room, taking turns calling him and having her give him a treat everytime he came to her. He did pretty good but I think my pup has A.D.D.! lol His concentration on one thing lasts all of 2 seconds. But it was a good experience with her and him.
I haven't really corrected him when he growls at her, I just pick him up and say "No Growling" and put him in his play pen. Nothing harsh though, I just want him to know that it is not being ignored either.
I have e-mailed my breeder and am still waiting for a response from him to see what he says also. I have no thoughts on rehoming him at all, but I just want to make sure that I do not end up with a dog that might hurt my kids, that is why I am asking for help.
We also had Makaylah helping with his training, I had taught him sit about a week ago and work on it with everything, from giving him his food to going out to go potty. She had him sitting tonight for treats. AND she was able to pet him, I think his stomach is bigger than his brain is! lol
Should I be concerned that he does have this little bit of aggression in him at such a young age?? He is only 11 weeks old.

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Post by Taz » Sat Nov 05, 2005 5:12 pm

Don't be concerned of him being a bit, what shall I say, arrogant as a puppy.
Diego was like that, not growling to much, but if he didn't got his will, he could growl and let me know what he thought about that.
You just have to be more stubborn than he is.
Now he is the sweetest dog on earth, kids could jump on him without him being mad.
I just had him much around kids, and that every experience he had with kids was positive.
Just do as you do now, and let him come to her.
And when he does, she gives him somehing he really likes, and he will assosiates her with something positive.
She should also train him on small things. Like sit.
(As you said he allready knows)

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Post by Victory » Sat Nov 05, 2005 5:21 pm

Chows treat, (and some other breeds) treat childern differently depending on the age of the child, most of them will tolerate almost anything from a child under five, but at five they (chows) tend to begin to see a child as more of an equal in the pack, someone who they can compete with for rank. This is going to be more evident in a male puppy who I'm thinking has a somewhat dominate personality. We all talk about how sweet our chows are here for the most part, but some of them aren't really that sweet they are aloof, dominate and quick to assert themselves.

Your daughter and your chow are at conflicting ages. If you're going to keep your chow, then you have to educate both of them. First how does your daughter react to the chows' behavior? Does she back up and show her fear? Then she's only encourageing him to behave this way. She should stand straight look him straight in the eye and repreimand him in a no nonsense tone that will tell him he is beneath her in the pack and that his behavior is not tolerated. She should be angry and show it in an appropriate manner. We teadch our childern to be gentle to control their tempers, but sometimes we need to teach them to be assertive and this is one of those times, look at it as good practice for standing up for herself for the rest of her life. It may be that she should feed him, and make sure he has water.

She should follow good training pratices for this, make him sit and wait until she releases him to eat. Also this is a good time to make sure that anyone can remove the food from him, you, your husband or even the childern.

Even though your daughter knows how to act around fearful animals, she needs the help to learn how to behave around ones that are assertive, which is very different from fearful, an assertive animal has to be taught just a bit of fear, a difficult thing to do but not impossible.

For a clue to how she should act when the puppy does something wrong with her, she should act like you do when you're unhappy with her, After all there is a way that you assert your place as the mommie, she has to learn to assert herself as jr. mommie to the chow.
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Post by Taz » Sat Nov 05, 2005 5:29 pm

Victory wrote:Chows treat, (and some other breeds) treat childern differently depending on the age of the child, most of them will tolerate almost anything from a child under five, but at five they (chows) tend to begin to see a child as more of an equal in the pack, someone who they can compete with for rank. This is going to be more evident in a male puppy who I'm thinking has a somewhat dominate personality. We all talk about how sweet our chows are here for the most part, but some of them aren't really that sweet they are aloof, dominate and quick to assert themselves.

Your daughter and your chow are at conflicting ages. If you're going to keep your chow, then you have to educate both of them. First how does your daughter react to the chows' behavior? Does she back up and show her fear? Then she's only encourageing him to behave this way. She should stand straight look him straight in the eye and repreimand him in a no nonsense tone that will tell him he is beneath her in the pack and that his behavior is not tolerated. She should be angry and show it in an appropriate manner. We teadch our childern to be gentle to control their tempers, but sometimes we need to teach them to be assertive and this is one of those times, look at it as good practice for standing up for herself for the rest of her life. It may be that she should feed him, and make sure he has water.

She should follow good training pratices for this, make him sit and wait until she releases him to eat. Also this is a good time to make sure that anyone can remove the food from him, you, your husband or even the childern.

Even though your daughter knows how to act around fearful animals, she needs the help to learn how to behave around ones that are assertive, which is very different from fearful, an assertive animal has to be taught just a bit of fear, a difficult thing to do but not impossible.

For a clue to how she should act when the puppy does something wrong with her, she should act like you do when you're unhappy with her, After all there is a way that you assert your place as the mommie, she has to learn to assert herself as jr. mommie to the chow.
I'm sorry. But that is just stupid.
Dogs are not wolves, and they do not see their human family as their pack.
But they do read their family, and looking dogs straight into their eyes is just plain stupid. The dogs gets insecure, and it's basicly a threat.
Getting mad at the dog, why? So she can make him more angry? and one day he will snap, and bite her?

She should rather show him that she is not a threat to him, that she won't hurt him.

But it's up to the owner of how to handle it.

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Post by Victory » Sat Nov 05, 2005 5:48 pm

Taz--
Most dogs are not wolves. but many are far more like wolves than some people like to realize. They all dogs are related to wolves and their insticnts come from there, scientific fact. I've had a male chow that would never, ever submit in any way, he stared down gang bangers with ease and guests in my house as well, but one word from me and he dropped his look and laid down. Some dogs more like wolves and those with ancient ancestory are more like them, we are their pack and sometimes we have to abide but the humanized rules of the pack.

If he doesn't learn his place and that before much longer he will bite, it's not a question of if but a question of when. And then it'll be all his fault and he will be marked as a dangerous dog.
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Post by Jeff&Peks » Sat Nov 05, 2005 5:54 pm

Don't put all the blame on your Chow.

We are going through the same thing with Pekoe and my 4 year old grandson, Pekoe will growl everytime he gets near her and yes your son is doing something to your Chow, he is trying to hold him and pet him, he is approaching your Chow and your Chow at this time doesn't want your son to approach him. What is your Chow doing when he growls at your son? Sleeping, eating, resting in a corner, or just doesn't want to be bothered?

I don't think its as bad as you think and I really don't think your Chow would actually bite your son, I have noticed most of the time when Pekoe growls at my grandson it is when she is eating, trying to sleep or he comes to close when she has tried everything to get away from him but even with the growling if he gets to close she will growl then jump up and go to another room to avoid him. Other times the two of them are walking together in the park or down the street, Pekoe just doesn't want to be bothered at home she wants piece and quiet.

Going by my grandson, your son is little, noisy and a pest (no Offense but he is a toddler) and your going to have to watch your son constantly and tell him to stay away and don't bother Ching, in time it will work out, millions of people have Chows and little kids, Chows are not the kid haters that people think they are. As for the obedience training I think Ching will continue to growl at your son no matter how much training you get until your son gets older and taller and your son has learned to respect your Chow.

Another theory I have about this is as a toddler I'm sure your constantly saying to him, don't do that, don't touch that, don't yell, don't go over there, I think the Chow picks up this so is putting it self at your level, so by growling they are disciplining in their own way, but like I said I really don't think your Chow will bit your son..
Actually as I type this, Conner, My grandson just bumped into Pekoe in the hallway, a spin a growl then they both went on their merry way.

One last thing, you say you love Chows but have you taken the time to learn what a Chow is all about, If you really knew and loved Chows the thought rehomeing (getting rid of) would never come to mind under any circumstances, Remember you don't have a dog you have a Chow, a Family member so put the dog books away and listen to your Chow.

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Post by Guest » Sat Nov 05, 2005 5:56 pm

Here is what my breeder wrote to me back.......................



" I'm not sure what is going through the puppy's mind. Usually puppies take to children more than adults. This is because kids are more interesting. Adults just kinda sit around, while kids are usually busy and puppies like that. Why he has singled out your daughter is unclear. Although 5 years old is a bit young for the responsibility of full care of the puppy, it will probably help for her to take over the feeding and basic care of him. If he has a particular place he sleeps (like the crate you are using), put some article of clothing your daughter has worn in it with him as bedding. This might help some. The nothing is free technique is a really good idea. Some puppies are just a bit afraid of children, due to the quick movements and such. If this is the case with him he will outgrow that in short order. Most puppies go through a stage in growing up where everything scares them. Toys that they played with one day will scare them to death the next day. This is usually a pretty short lived stage they go through. The growling usually indicates a lack of trust. Having your daughter do the feeding and such will help with this. If he is in puppy classes, have your daughter participate in his home lessons as much as possible also.
The trust and respect of a chow must be earned. It is not something that they give to everyone. It may take a little time for him to figure it out. I have a one year old male here that I am working with for a lady who lost control of her chow. He has taken over her life. She always gave him whatever he wanted and he came to expect it. She never disciplined the dog as a puppy. When he tried to eat the vet and three vet techs when she took him in for a shot she realized that she had a definate problem. This dog would not allow me to enter his kennel at all at first, but now I go in and pet him and take him for walks every day. He trusts me to a point, but not completely as yet. This has taken about a month of working with him every day. The point of all this info is that the puppy must have limits set and enforced while he is a puppy. Growling is beyond those limits. He needs to be taught before he becomes too set in his ways. Growling is getting him what he wants. He needs to be taught that growling not only doesn't get the right results, but often gets him in deep trouble. I hope this helps some, and keep me posted on how he is doing. Maybe I can come up with some other things to try."

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Post by Taz » Sat Nov 05, 2005 6:01 pm

I think I know what method you train, and we are very different.
So I don't think we will agree on this.

Humans and dogs are different species, and therefor dogs don't look at their human family as their pack.
And when humans studied wolves (to studie the dog), they studied wolves in captivity, and therefor they didn't get the right image of the wolves.
In nature, there is seldom fights. But in captivity there is not much space, and the wolves often get's in each others way and therefor they often fights.

Dogs has no need for fighting for their rank in a human family.
The dog has all it needs. Food several times a day, walks osv.
Dogs as no intention to take over the family.
They just doesn't think that way.

If it is so important to establish rank with your dog, why haven't my dog taken the highest rank?
I never punish him, and never stare at him, never does any of the things you say a dog owner has to do.
And my dog is pretty dominant.
And still, I have no trouble with him.

Dogs hasn't been wolves for over 14 thousand years, thats a pretty long time.
So dogs are not wolves, they are dogs.

I know many people are going to be mad at me now, but Chows are dogs to. So putting away dog books, just because you have a Chow, don't see why you should do that.

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Post by Guest » Sat Nov 05, 2005 6:12 pm

Jeff and Pecks,
I am sorry but I just had to say, I have a daughter not a son.
Also, it is my 5, almost 6 year old that he is having issues with. What is Chingy doing at the time, usually playing. But he has no problem letting my 3 year old daughter play with him and pet him and hold him. Only Makaylah. We are going to work on letting her train him, and let her feed him and get good associations with her.
I have done ALOT of research on the chow breed. The reason that I mentioned the rehoming thing, and if you go back and read it says I DO NOT want to rehome him. Lots of people , that is the first thing they suggest. But I will also not let my kids get bitten either. THAT is why I am asking what to do.

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Post by Jeff&Peks » Sat Nov 05, 2005 6:15 pm

Woops, your talking about a Puppy, a puppy does need to learn some discipline just like a Child so teach Ching and your daughter to respect each other and talk to the both of them when the growling starts, no hitting or yelling, a slap of a newspaper on the counter and a stern,no growling, that's bad with some training will probably solve this whole thing.

The responses to this post are coming in faster then i can type, i just changed son to daughter.

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Post by Zhuyos mom » Sat Nov 05, 2005 7:27 pm

I've never had this problem. But I'm going to ask you questions to think about nd offer a suggestion just because you might want to give it a try.

Is Makaylah similiar in height as Chingy? Perhaps he is seeing her as a chow playmate of sorts. Is it a grrrrr (get out of my face I'm going to snap at you) or a growl (hey watch it)? Can you distinguish his vocals yet?

I would try a couple of things. If Makaylah tries to hold or hug Chingy and he growls again: have a shake can ready (or a spray bottle of water) and say "no" or use a secret word only for that behavior with Makayla and shake the can once sharply or spray the bottle of water directly on his face. If he stops the growling or backs up, then say good Chingy immediately. Then have Makaylah offer Chingy a small treat that he likes. You can try this a couple of times to see if Chingy warms up to Makaylah. If Chingy displays this behavior just because Makaylah is around him, then have Makaylah say the word "no" or the secret word, and have her sharply turn her back on him, or ignore him in a way that he knows she is ignoring him. Remember you must be always be there if Makaylah is doing this.

Different raising a chowling, isn't it ChowLover? But it's all worth it. I bet you Makaylah and Chingy will be the best of friends. He'll be 15 when Makaylah graduates college!

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Post by chow0 » Sat Nov 05, 2005 8:40 pm

do you and your daughters ever lay on the floor and let your chowling just sniff, lick, pull on your pant leg, shirt, or tickle your belly? (together of coarse) if not i would try this! it will teach him there's no fear of him and he should not fear you. this is my 2nd chow and my brother had 2, i've seen both sides of chows. he's a baby treat him like that for another month or two and he'll grow into what you expect.

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Post by kingalls » Sat Nov 05, 2005 9:49 pm

I think that Chows are sensitive to the different things we humans project. Most people we meet along our walks are not a problem..then we might come across someone and both have significant reactions to something that the person is giving off.
I do agree with Victory that we need to demonstrate the alpha attitude with our Chows. They are very intelligent. I do think they know when they can be dominant and it is up to the human to let them know otherwise.
I think it's difficult to know what going on between Chi-Ching and your 5 year old but ultimately your daughter needs to establish a heirarchy - like he is fed when she feeds him, she lets him know when the growling is not appropriate. I think you need to help her assert herself as Chi-Ching's alpha. If Chi-Ching and your daughter are at the same height, you might need to help by lifting her up while she is giving him a command.
I know you will figure out the best solution from everyone's different posts.

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Post by arnis » Sat Nov 05, 2005 11:07 pm

yes, I agree with King and Victory. Pack order needs set now.
I took Kahn to a dog shrink, that teaches owners to teach agressive breeds. Reason is because you want your dog obeying you and not a trainer.
But trainer used the pack method to train me and kahn and it worked great.
The reason you have to have your daughter scold him is because if you scold him it will reinforce his idea that you are alpha and he is 2nd, which means he still gets to boss her around... But, i hear alot of talk about how well "nothing in life is free" method does wonders... So, i am going to try that with my puppy.
And Taz, my 5 week old puppies have a pecking order.... And they draw blood fighting over it all the time... at 5 weeks old it amazes me how voilent they can get at that age..

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Post by Judy Fox » Sun Nov 06, 2005 1:25 am

Arnis - you are so right. Puppies do have pecking order and I suspect that this is what is happening - Ching thinks he is No 2.
The younger girl is not a threat - she is still a baby!
The 5 yr. old is, as most 5 yr. olds are, - gosh! how can I say it without giving offence :? bossy, full of her own importance, confident?, eldest daughter of the household, - No 2 (maybe) - so there is the problem I think!
So as the others have said, she has to establish herself as part of the pecking order!
However, it must also be remembered that Ching is a baby too. Is he getting enough rest and solitude.
When Milly was a chowling, I had three young grandaughters around for hours in the day - I had them here before school, took them to school, brought them home from school and gave them their tea. Chowlings are so delightful - like animated teddy bears. It must be remembered they are not toys neither are they dogs. They are chows. I still maintain they are Chows and not dogs.
I have had many dog puppies over the years and chowlings are different.
My grandaughters wanted to cuddle her and dress her up and control her and it soon became apparent that she wasn't going to have any of it.
I laid down strict rules - if Milly Ching was in her box asleep, she was not to be disturbed - catagorically NOT - if she was eating she was to be left alone, ABSOLUTELY. If she was playing she could be played with, on her terms and when the playing was done, that was it.
She was not to be treated as a toy - she was allowed her privacy - now she is an absolutely gorgeoous Chow lady who greets those same grandaughters, with love and excitement when they visit.
She adores them as does Mabel - because, I believe, she was given privacy when she was a chowling.
The thing is, carting a chowling round like a living toy is out or order. They are very proud, aloof creatures - their homes are their castles.
It must also be remembered that Ching is probably out-ageing the 5 yr. old already. He will mature much quicker than she will and so will think he is higher up in the command chain.
How this is to be dealt with I really don't know. Instinct, I suppose. I don't go along with all this arty-farty stuff - I believe and would advocate - I am the Mummy Person, I say, you all do!!
I agree that this situation must stop and I would suggest that something has happened to make Chingy growl at one person and not another.
I think a "Aah! Pack it in Ching!" and encourage the child to get on with her own business etc. is a good start.
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Post by Taz » Sun Nov 06, 2005 4:07 am

arnis wrote:yes, I agree with King and Victory. Pack order needs set now.
I took Kahn to a dog shrink, that teaches owners to teach agressive breeds. Reason is because you want your dog obeying you and not a trainer.
But trainer used the pack method to train me and kahn and it worked great.
The reason you have to have your daughter scold him is because if you scold him it will reinforce his idea that you are alpha and he is 2nd, which means he still gets to boss her around... But, i hear alot of talk about how well "nothing in life is free" method does wonders... So, i am going to try that with my puppy.
And Taz, my 5 week old puppies have a pecking order.... And they draw blood fighting over it all the time... at 5 weeks old it amazes me how voilent they can get at that age..
Yes, between dogs. Not between dogs and humans.
We are a different species.
Dogs don't understand why we does all the things we do, and by punish him and do other things to tell the dog that he has not the higest rank only makes an unhappy and confused dog.

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Post by Rogansmommy » Sun Nov 06, 2005 4:45 am

I disagree with the post earlier about your daughter looking away from your dog. That is a sign of submissive behavior and should never be done. Yawning is also a sign of stress, and if Ching believes that your daughter is stressed AND submissive, he will walk all over her.

I still think Ching does not trust your daughter. He's feeling a 'vibe' whether you realize it or not. Put him on a leash and have her walk him. Have her feed him and let him out to potty (and also let him in).

In Ching's eyes, your younger child is a puppy - his equal, a playmate and no threat yet - which is why there is no problem there.
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Post by Taz » Sun Nov 06, 2005 5:33 am

Rogansmommy wrote:I disagree with the post earlier about your daughter looking away from your dog. That is a sign of submissive behavior and should never be done. Yawning is also a sign of stress, and if Ching believes that your daughter is stressed AND submissive, he will walk all over her.

I still think Ching does not trust your daughter. He's feeling a 'vibe' whether you realize it or not. Put him on a leash and have her walk him. Have her feed him and let him out to potty (and also let him in).

In Ching's eyes, your younger child is a puppy - his equal, a playmate and no threat yet - which is why there is no problem there.
I don't agree with you.
Jawning calms the dog down. And looking away is a sign thats says
"i'm no threat"
And I ask again, if you believe so strongly that the signs means that, why do I have no trouble with my dog?

And my sisters dog is a very stressed dog, Not a Chow, and everytime I visit him, he get''s to excited and wants to jump all over me, but then I jawn and looks away and the dog stops it right away.
Why do you think that is?

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Rogansmommy
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Post by Rogansmommy » Sun Nov 06, 2005 7:25 am

[quote="Taz]
I don't agree with you.
Jawning calms the dog down. And looking away is a sign thats says
"i'm no threat"
And I ask again, if you believe so strongly that the signs means that, why do I have no trouble with my dog?

And my sisters dog is a very stressed dog, Not a Chow, and everytime I visit him, he get''s to excited and wants to jump all over me, but then I jawn and looks away and the dog stops it right away.
Why do you think that is?[/quote]

You are confusing two different techniques.

The first technique of having a child look away from a dog is a sign of submission. Any animal that tries to stare you down and win claims dominance over you.

The second technique, which works well when used properly, is ignoring a dog when it is being a fool. It also requires you to turn your body away and keep a closed body posture. NOT a technique a child should use.
Michele

^Rogan^ at the Bridge on 5/16/09 -- always in my heart

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arnis
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Post by arnis » Sun Nov 06, 2005 7:28 am

Taz, i am sorry you believe this.. but ok, your right, we are not dogs... so how do YOU know what they think when they are scolded or looked over for someone else? i know what i practice works for Kahn. what worked for you worked for you. But pecking order does play a major part in raising an agressive dog... chow chow's are agressive dogs and must be treated so, when you treat them like lil cuddly teaddy bears is when the problems begin.

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Post by Rogansmommy » Sun Nov 06, 2005 7:30 am

Taz wrote:
Dogs has no need for fighting for their rank in a human family.
The dog has all it needs. Food several times a day, walks osv.
Dogs as no intention to take over the family.
They just doesn't think that way.

If it is so important to establish rank with your dog, why haven't my dog taken the highest rank?
I never punish him, and never stare at him, never does any of the things you say a dog owner has to do.
And my dog is pretty dominant.
And still, I have no trouble with him.
Sorry, Taz, but I disagree with this as well. A chow (or any other strong breed) will take over the rank in a household if they do not have the confidence in their pack. Chows were bred to be independent thinkers and at any time, if they feel they should be higher then a member of the pack, they will establish that any way they can.

I have worked with (and only owned) strong willed breeds (rottweilers and chows) for over 10 years. Your dog must view you as dominant. You can do this without punishment (and with a chow, you should, as they will 'bite the hand that feeds them') and without staring and yelling. Sometimes, it's just the aura you have that's enough. But a dog will try and take over a pack if given the opportunity.

Also, do not forget, Chows are one of the closest breeds to the wolf as they are an ancient breed.
Michele

^Rogan^ at the Bridge on 5/16/09 -- always in my heart

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