Does anyone participate in Dog Shows?????

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Shane
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Does anyone participate in Dog Shows?????

Post by Shane » Wed Oct 19, 2005 3:33 pm

Does anyone particpate in Dog Shows mainly the conformation ring. If so please say because I would like to ask you several questions. The questions will refer to basic "down and back" speed, proper way to stack a chow (free) baiting and other things.

Shane

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dog shows

Post by chowpuppies » Fri Oct 21, 2005 6:20 am

i will be soon but i will have a handler doing it for me :lol:
I do know a couple that could answer you qustion for you i will get their email address or web site and you can ask them
if that would help you
in a couple of months i could help you more but i am just learning :!:

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Post by Rogansmommy » Fri Oct 21, 2005 7:57 am

I've only done Obedience competitions, so I'm afraid I wouldn't be much help. I do know how to teach the Stand for Exam, but that's probably different from Stacking. Sorry. :cry:
Michele

^Rogan^ at the Bridge on 5/16/09 -- always in my heart

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Post by carolyn dewrance » Sun Oct 23, 2005 6:24 am

Shane you might find this very informative.
APPOINTMENT WITH CHOWS. Written and permission given for publication By Mr. R, C. Stephens. 1986
I am sitting at the judge table in the corner of the ring looking through the pages of my judging book to get some idea of the numbers of entries in? Each class. There are no names in the book, neither of dogs, nor exhibitors, only their entry numbers. Off to one side my ring Steward is calling in the dogs entered for the class to be judged, checking them against the numbers in his steward's book and setting them into line.
He walks over, book in hand "they are all ready for you, two absentees, most are new dogs, but the two at the far end have come up from earlier classes, so you have already seen them." I take a look down the line, first from one end to get an idea of the heads and fronts (this is why I like them to be pointing in the same direction, i.e. to the handlers right), then a broadside -on look to check for size, outline and general leonine bearing. At this stage it may be possible to decide that one or both of the dogs coming forward from the previous class has little chance against the new ones" alternatively one of them may be good enough to serve as the yardstick against which to assess the best of the newcomers.
The it is a case of "take them around please" and the dogs are moved around in a circle in the ring I like to get at least two good looks at each dog as it moves past my line of sight. The trick here is to look steadily along a single line until all the dogs have passed, and then to swivel around so the line of sight is back onto the lead Chow, fixing on the new line until all the dogs have passed in a large class it may be necessary to have the dogs make two complete circuits so as to give fair and equal consideration to each one. What am I looking for here? Movement, obviously I want to see that stilted rear action and straight hock then size and general massiveness, head carriage (is he a proud walker? Tail carriage when moving, forward reach profile and cobbiness. This phase of the judging often indicates to me particular aspects of construction that I will examine more closely when I come to look at the dogs as individuals, e.g. shoulder and front assembly, arch of neck, hock and backend. Certainly if the hind action is at all suspect. At this stage, with all the dogs moving together none of them is able to show off his natural free moving gait, so one can only get a rough idea each will have to be moved separately as an individual later on.
Having completed their circuit, the handlers bring their dogs into line and set them up for examination" it is time for me to go thoroughly over each dog comparing each with each and all with my interpretation of the Breed Standard It is important now to go through essentially the same sequence of investigation with each dog, to give them all an equal chance. Sometimes a part of the sequence varies of there was a specific point during the earlier movement around the ring that I want to look at more closely to check the basic structure and conformation. First I look closely at the dog’s front checking width across the shoulders front legs parallel, balance of head and breadth of skull, ear size shape and placement has the dog got the correct leonine appearance and scowl? Are the face and muzzle typical for the breed? Check eyes small and dark with ample filling under the eyes. Is the face excessively wrinkled (my particular phobia for Chows living in hot countries)? Now for the mouth usually I like to open it myself for examination, but I do concede there are times when it is advisable for the exhibitor do it for me, although here a clever (crafty) handler can sometimes disguise some less desirable aspect of the mouth. You will all know what I am seeking, a scissor bite preferably with a bluish tongue in a black mouth, Now feel over the skull, checking for breadth and flatness, finger and thumb to feel the substance of the ear and that it has a rounded tip- So far so good, now right hand spread along the neck, I am seeking here with the tip of thumb at base of skull and small finger at the withers for a slight arch to a strong and rather short neck set well into the shoulders. From the neck the hand runs down the shoulder, feeling for the slope of the shoulder blade down to the point of the shoulder and along the upper arm trying out the dogs musculature on the way. Although the foreleg. Must be perfectly straight and parallel, the upper arm needs to slope backwards from the point of the shoulder. It is here, at the foreleg that I examine the weight of bone before going down to the foot, which I like to pick up and place on the palm of my hand to determine clearly that U is a round cat foot, tight and small. The depth of pad and tightness of foot on my hand tells me whether the dog stands well up on his toes. I must see that the front legs are parallel and by now most dogs will have moved somewhat under examination, so I usually pick up the dog's front and drop it down again to achieve the proper stance before going in to check the chest and ribs. A hand underneath between the front legs will indicate the width of the chest and then I compress the coat so that I can see if the chest reaches down to about the elbow, or if the coat gives a false impression of real depth.
Run the right hand down over the ribs and then along the back to find the short coupling so essential to the well balanced Chow. Too great a space behind the ribs implies a weak back, with to much load on the spine here, a possible spinal trouble in later life, However, in this matter of short coupling, I am prepared to forgive a bitch being slightly long, it gives more space to carry her whelps and goodness knows, whelping is already difficult enough in the breed. The hand now runs along the back line and gives me a good idea of the mass of the frame beneath the coat. This is the time; too when I examine the coat for texture, profuseness and that a soft wooly undercoat underlies the longer, coarser guard hairs. A look at the tail carriage now, and then open out the tail to check the set on. I am checking here that the tail is natural in line extension of the spine. A hand spread over the loin? Now check the width and musculature as well as the bone structure here at the croup. Finally the hand run down the hind legs look for muscle and the straight hocks, well let down. For a male, the static "examination concludes by checking for entirety. Now for the dynamics of movement. "Move your dog in a triangle, please" and here I like to see the handler pause for a moment to collect himself and his dog before taking off with a firm steady stride at the pace which shows off the gait of his dog to best advantage -so many of your exhibitors tend to walk to slowly and not in a straight line. On the out walk I am looking for parallel rear action, (or slightly angled in at a faster pace) symmetry of movement and a straight line along the line of advance (i.e. no crabbing). On the cross walk I look for tail carriage, typy outline, stilted hind action and that dignified walk with attention and interest in what he is doing. Finally the in walk shows parallel front action, no elbowing out, no plaiting etc. breadth of chest, and proud head carriage. To a standstill for a final look at overall balance. Then on to the next dog in the line sometimes with a black or blue chow I may find it necessary to ask the handler to reposition his dog at a different angle to the sun, as these colors can make the dog very difficult to see properly when the animal stands in its own shade. The front can be particularly difficult to judge fairly if the light comes from behind the dog.
Reading over what I have written it seems a long-winded process, but in fact it isn’t, and it is very necessary to give each dog in the class the same chance as all the others.
One thing I dislike is fault judging, but it is never the less necessary to carry in mind those significant faults noticed during the examination. As later it may be required to separate two dogs of other wise equal merit. After going over all the dogs in the same way, one can usually decide on most
Of the clasp placing, but sometimes two or more dogs are so equal that it is necessary to look over them again, this time in a comparative basis. Here I like to put them side-by-side, maybe move them together to decide on their order of Placing. Now I can call my Ring Steward over and give him my placing while he is calling the results I made a few short notes on the first three class placeings for my judging effort, and that class is finished, bring on the next.
Shane on this day My Chow Chow Bitch won best bitch on show, and My male was placed as best Junior on show, My puppy was placed best puppy on show, I was very proud of my lovely chow chows that day and went home with 120 Kg of dog food and would you believe it 40 bottles of Mayonaise. The dog food and mayonasie were sponcered by Nolo the food people. I loved showing my dogs, but these days I feel I am now leaving it up to the younger members of our Club and as I live in Natal and the shows are held in the Transvaal that’s about 500miles away, I feel it is just to far to travel considering the cost of fuel, over night accomadation and entry fees. All now beyond the means of my pocket.
Good luck with your showing and have fun.
Carolyn
Carolyn Dewrance
4 Fernwood Close
Richwood
Cape Town 7441

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Taz
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Post by Taz » Sun Oct 23, 2005 10:49 pm

I know a little about dogshows.

It isn't me on the picture, it's a friend of mine.
She handlet Diego for me once.
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Post by Shane » Tue Oct 25, 2005 4:12 pm

Very much thanx Carolyn for that lenghty but very much helpful info. I am trying to attend my very first Dog Show at the Bahamas Kennel Club in March 19- 20. I know its kinda far but I better practice stacking, down and back and other techniques needed. The Bahamas has only one dog show per year which is a problem for me watching Dog Shows has made me a fanatic for it. So to campaigne dogs would be quite expensive if I am to campaigne dogs in the Caribbean and the US.

Taz I have to add, veiwing picyures of champions as pups, you may have a champion on your hands. What placement did he came that day.

Shane

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Post by Taz » Tue Oct 25, 2005 10:20 pm

Shane wrote:Very much thanx Carolyn for that lenghty but very much helpful info. I am trying to attend my very first Dog Show at the Bahamas Kennel Club in March 19- 20. I know its kinda far but I better practice stacking, down and back and other techniques needed. The Bahamas has only one dog show per year which is a problem for me watching Dog Shows has made me a fanatic for it. So to campaigne dogs would be quite expensive if I am to campaigne dogs in the Caribbean and the US.

Taz I have to add, veiwing picyures of champions as pups, you may have a champion on your hands. What placement did he came that day.

Shane
He became BOS. (Is it that in English.? Best of Opposite *Censored Word*) :D
Where can I find pictures of Champions as pups? :)

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Where you can find pictures of champions as pups.

Post by Shane » Wed Oct 26, 2005 2:55 pm

Well when you are online all you have to search for Netchows.com. All you have to do is go on the web site and go into "Champion Gallery". There you will see pics of chows that are champions world wide, and their owners and or breeders link. Their you will visit their sites and look at their champions and usually you'll see pictures of champions when they were pups and even now.

Here are some links that have their champions with their puppy pics:
http://www.chrismachows.com/

Right now I can't remember the rest.

Shane

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Post by Taz » Thu Oct 27, 2005 2:11 am

Thank you. :D

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